The amazing London skyline view from the Cooke Fawcett’s Peckham Observatory

(via Dezeen)

The architecture studio Cooke Fawcett has built an elevated walkway on top of a multi-storey car park in Peckham, south London. The artfully designed space is also used as an open-air gallery by arts organisation Bold Tendencies.

 

Aptly named as the Peckham Observatory, the structure is steel framed and stands like a table over the entrance to the rooftop, which is also the venue of Frank’s Cafe. This is a Campari bar covered by a red tent-like awning.

 

The walkway is 35 metres long and spans the full width of the building. The decking and steps are made from mangueira hardwood which gives the structure the appearance of a beachside boardwalk.

The metalwork has been painted in green, as the aim was to compliment the car park’s original structures. The same goes with the midnight blue ticketing booth Cooke Fawcett tucked beneath it.

Oliver Cooke and Francis Fawcett set up their practice Cooke Fawcett in 2015 after working together on Herzog & de Meuron’s extension to the Tate Modern gallery in London and the Blavatnik School of Government in Oxford.

The pair were commissioned for this project by Bold Tendencies, which gallerist Hannah Barry set up in 2007. The organisation hosts an art programme in the disused parking bays and roof of the car park from May until September each summer, although its future is now threatened by the car park’s redevelopment. (all via Dezeen)

 

Nowadays, the roof of this Peckham car park is famous for its amazing views towards London as well as the artwork on it. Proceeds from the Frank’s Cafe, which was designed by Lettice Drake and Paloma Gormley of Practice Architecture in 2009, go towards funding the local arts programme.

 

The Southwark Council is currently redeveloping the lower levels of the car park, which means that the Bold Tendencies art programme’s days are counted. The lower levels of the car park will be redeveloped into 800 studios to cater towards London’s increasing artist population.

 

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